How an experimental physicist lives

Apr 02, 2015 living South Dakota radon radiation health phys-332

radon concentration vermillion south dakota basement

“I don’t make nukes in my basement, why should I care?”, you may ask. Well, if you’ve never thought about radiation protection at home, chances are that the concentration of a type of natually existing radioactive gas, radon, in your basement is many times higher than the acceptable level. The plot shown here is the radon concentration in the basement of a random house in Vermillion, SD, over several days. It is always higher than the level set by EPA. The owner never heard about radon and did not take any action to reduce the concentration. If you are alike, please consider following the advice from EPA.

Two undergraduate students from my class PHYS-332, Experimental Modern Physics, accept requests from individual residences at Vermillion, SD to measure the radon concentration in their houses for two days. We charge $20 dollars for each measurement, which is way below the market price. The money will be used to support research activities of undergraduate students.

About

Blogs on physics research and educational activities of Jing LIU, an assistant professor in physics at the University of South Dakota. He is an experimental physicist developing novel particle detectors for astroparticle physics and civil use.